Thank you for choosing to buy locally from a record store!

You can explore 3 ways to buy:

Find and visit a Local Record Store and get phone number and directions (call first, there is no guarantee which products may be in stock locally)

Purchase now from a local store that sells online

Purchase digitally now from (which serves local record stores)

Find a local store(Please call first)

Store Location Distance Phone Buy
DISCLAIMER: there are a lot of independent record stores that participate in Record Store Day. Not all of them will choose to participate in all promotions, or carry all releases. Just because a store is listed here does NOT mean it will have the goodie or record you are looking for. That said, find a store near you and check with them directly. It is always a good idea to be BFFs with your neighborhood record store.


''South of Heaven'' is the fourth studio album by the American thrash metal band Slayer. Released on July 5, 1988, the album was the band's second collaboration with record producer Rick Rubin, whose production skills on Slayer's previous album ''Reign in Blood'' had helped the band's sound evolve.

''South of Heaven'' was Slayer's second album to enter the ''Billboard'' 200, and its last to be released by Def Jam Recordings, although the album became an American Recordings album after Rick Rubin ended his partnership with Russell Simmons. It was one of only two Def Jam titles to be distributed by Geffen Records through Warner Bros. Records because of original distributor Columbia Records's refusal to release work by the band. The release peaked at number 57 and in 1992 was awarded a gold certification by the Recording Industry Association of America. In order to offset the pace of the group's previous album, Slayer deliberately slowed down the album's tempo. In contrast to their previous albums, the band utilized undistorted guitars and toned-down vocals. While some critics praised this musical change, others—more accustomed to the style of earlier releases—were disappointed. Despite this, the songs "Mandatory Suicide" and the title track became permanent features of the band's live setlist. - Wikipedia