Spoon - Kill The Moonlight | RECORD STORE DAY
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''Kill the Moonlight'' is the fourth album from Austin, Texas indie rock band Spoon, released on August 20, 2002 to a great deal of critical acclaim. - Wikipedia

Spoon singer/songwriter Britt Daniel has a voice that's tailor-made forrock 'n' roll: it bends, breaks, crackles, smolders and puts you ina place that's anywhere and everywhere all at once. And Daniel's sucha cruel heartbreaker: when he growls over the piano vamp on the bridge to "Allthe Pretty Girls Go to the City," it just screams S-E-X. As with past efforts,the group's latest full-length achieves its remarkable potency from theway it transports the listener. 1998's aborted major-label entry A Seriesof Sneaks generated a classic Pixies buzz, while last year's terrificGirls Can Tell took its cues from the expansive post-punk of XTC andWire. As for Kill the Moonlight: it's another minor masterpiece,even if it doesn't sound like Spoon at all. Which is no big surprise, consideringhow eagerly Daniel and company have approached the problem of sustaining theirown interest by reinventing themselves on each successive record.

Daniel's fondness for Joe Jackson and Elvis Costello is still front andcenter here, but his genuine affection for John Lennon has begun to seep throughthe cracks, both lyrically ("I'm not dumb/ Just want to hold yourhand," he warbles on "Paper Tiger") and musically ("Backto the Life" even follows the serpentine curves of the Beatles' "GetBack"). The record's peaks are dizzying, from the heavy-petting andpanting that opens "Stay Don't Go" to the way Daniel likens therules of sexual attraction to The Chicago Manual of Style on "Somethingto Look Forward To." And "Jonathon Fisk" is pure, unadulteratedgenius; not only does it actually sound like the "atom bombs and bluntrazors" described in its chorus, but it edges 1000 times closer to distillingthe Lennon/McCartney ethos than anything out of the Guided by Voices camp hasin years.