Jay-Z - Blueprint 2.1 | RECORD STORE DAY

back to top

RECORD STORE DAY

Thank you for choosing to buy locally from a record store!

Buy Now

Store Distance Phone Buy
Loading...

You can explore 3 ways to buy:

Find and visit a Local Record Store and get phone number and directions (call first, there is no guarantee which products may be in stock locally)

Purchase now from a local store that sells online

Purchase digitally now from recordstoreday.com (which serves local record stores)

These Indie stores carry most genres and you may want to also check with them

Store Distance Phone
Loading...

Find a local store

(Please call first)

$9.99   Buy MP3 Album

Reviews:

''The Blueprint 2.1'' is a compilation album, by rapper Jay-Z, created from a re-cut version of ''The Blueprint²: The Gift & the Curse''. It was certified gold by the RIAA. One LP single was released,"Stop /Excuse Me Miss Again". - Wikipedia

The theory has always been that inside of every double album is a great singlealbum struggling to get out. In the case of Jay-Z's 2002 double-CD The Blueprint2: The Gift and the Curse, though, it's closer to the truth to say that there'sa great EP struggling to get out. That's not what The Blueprint 2.1 is, though:it's an hour-long version of the previous album featuring 10 songs from TheGift and the Curse and two new ones. The best and worst you can say about itis that it used to have too much and now has a little more than it really oughtto (nadir: the Lenny Kravitz collaboration "Guns & Roses"). Thatand Jay-Z seems to have lost the knack for programming an album, since 2.1 doesn'treally pick up steam until the fourth track, the hit single "'03 Bonnie& Clyde." But the fact that he's rethought his own strategy a merehandful of months after the original version of the disc appeared may be thebiggest chink in his formerly bulletproof armor. Maybe he really will make hisnext album his last.

Speaking of bulletproof, 50 Cent's The New Breed actually is an EP. Well, OK,it's a DVD with a bonus disc featuring three songs, none of which appear onhis smash debut, Get Rich or Die Tryin'. That doesn't necessarily make the packagea bargain, however. "True Loyalty" is thug-love-by-numbers, the G-Unitremix of "8 Mile Road" plods along like a home demo, and "Inda Hood" sounds like a 45-second interlude stretched out to three minutes.50 may be a relative newcomer compared to Jay-Z, but he's every bit as cannya market-flooder—or do I mean rip-off artist?