Darrin Bradbury - Artvertisement [Crystal Clear LP] | RECORD STORE DAY

back to top

RECORD STORE DAY

Thank you for choosing to buy locally from a record store!

Preorder Now

Store Distance Phone Preorder
Loading...

You can explore 3 ways to buy:

Find and visit a Local Record Store and get phone number and directions (call first, there is no guarantee which products may be in stock locally)

Purchase now from a local store that sells online

Purchase digitally now from recordstoreday.com (which serves local record stores)

These Indie stores carry most genres and you may want to also check with them

Store Distance Phone
Loading...

Find a local store

(Please call first)

DISC: 1

1. Field Notes from a College Town
2. Artvertisement
3. XXY Top Left
4. Exile on Myrtle Beach
5. The Wedding Song
6. Deanna, Deanna
7. Shiny Town
8. Pizza & Drugs
9. 15 Shovels
10. Those Beautiful Days
11. Busted World
12. Mikey Shoulda Died

More Info:

Artvertisement is Bradbury’s third album and second release for ANTI-, following his critically acclaimed 2019 LP Talking Dogs & Atom Bombs. Bradbury wrote Artvertisement while touring in support of Talking Dogs, and recorded the album at Trace Horse Studio in March of 2020 over the strange, anxious handful of days between Nashville’s devastating March 3rd tornado and the start of the COVID-19 shutdown.

The title Artvertisement was inspired by Bradbury’s difficult experiences navigating the polished, often soulless Nashville music industry, where record label executives would laud his songwriting — some going so far as to call him a genius — but ultimately turn him away because his music wasn’t commercial.

While music is still his primary focus, Bradbury has leaned into working on visual art, which, like his music, draws out both the darkness and the humor of the everyday. His art aligns aesthetically with his music. His portraits are abstract, while his smaller sketches veer more toward humor and commentary. He sells his art on a “pay what you want” model, explaining that he is as happy to sell a painting for a nickel as he is for five hundred dollars.

It may not be the kind of financial model that lands him a high-rise office overlooking downtown Nashville, but that’s always been the antithesis of what Bradbury is about. “Do no harm but take what you need,” he says. “Holding on to success, holding onto money... What does it matter? We’re all going to die someday.”