Wet - Still Run [LP] | RECORD STORE DAY

back to top

RecordStore Day

Thank you for choosing to buy locally from a record store!

Buy Now

Store Distance Phone Buy
Loading...

You can explore 3 ways to buy:

Find and visit a Local Record Store and get phone number and directions (call first, there is no guarantee which products may be in stock locally)

Purchase now from a local store that sells online

Purchase digitally now from recordstoreday.com (which serves local record stores)

These Indie stores carry most genres and you may want to also check with them

Store Distance Phone
Loading...

Find a local store

(Please call first)

$9.99   Buy MP3 Album

More Info:

Still Run is the new album from Brooklyn, NY based alternative band Wet, and is the follow up to the band’s critically acclaimed debut album Don’t You from 2016.

Still Run shows Wet with a more upbeat and pop driven sound than their debut. The band’s new sound and new outlook, is informed by lead singer and songwriter Kelly Zutrau taking more creative control of the project. Much of Wet's shift stems from Zutrau's more forceful vocals, which allow her direct, yet poetic lyrics to resonate more deeply, and which leap out of the sunnier production. Producers like Rostam (Haim, Solange), Andrew Sarlo (Big Thief), and John Hill (Santigold, M.I.A.) assisted primary producer and Wet band member Joe Valle, who brings a new comfort level to his production style, presenting dark lyrics in a brighter way that highlights their innate intensity and lets Zutrau's songwriting shine. "There are a million ways to make a good song sound good," she says. "But what matters to me most in the end are the vocal, and the songwriting, and whatever serves those best."

Wet is recognized for their deeply-hued emotional pop, well documented by the New York Times, Spin, and NPR among many others. Rolling Stone noted that Wet “set themselves apart with music that combines the elegant ache of Nineties R&B with the raw honesty of indie pop…”. Still Run is a testament to taking that control and pursuing one's artistic vision—and it also shows how any hiccups that might crop up along the way can make the vision's eventual realization more satisfying.