West Meets East Indian Music & Its Influence - West Meets East: Indian Music & Its Influence (Uk) | RECORD STORE DAY

back to top

RecordStore Day

Thank you for choosing to buy locally from a record store!

Buy Now

Store Distance Phone Buy
Loading...

You can explore 3 ways to buy:

Find and visit a Local Record Store and get phone number and directions (call first, there is no guarantee which products may be in stock locally)

Purchase now from a local store that sells online

Purchase digitally now from recordstoreday.com (which serves local record stores)

These Indie stores carry most genres and you may want to also check with them

Store Distance Phone
Loading...

Find a local store

(Please call first)

DISC: 1

1. Sindhi Bhairavi (Morning Raga) - Ravi Shankar
2. Sextet India - John Coltrane
3. My Favorite Things - John Coltrane
4. Raag Yaman Kalyan: Teen Tala (Evening Raga) - Ali Akbar Khan
5. Calcutta Blues - Dave Brubeck Quartet
6. New Delhi - Cannonball Adderley Quintet Plus
7. New Delhi - Victor Feldman Quartet
8. Left Alone - Eric Dolphy Quintet
9. Darbari Kanada (Alap ; Gat In Teentaal) (Deep Night Raga) - Sharan Rani 1
10. India - Sun Ra And His Arkestra 1
11. Lonely Woman - Ornette Coleman Quartet 1
12. Mirage For Miles - Paul Horn Quintet Featuring Emil Richards 1
13. Milestones - Miles Davis 1
14. Modal - Joe Harriott Quintet 1
15. Miyan Ki Malhar (Rainy Season Raga) - Ustad Vilayat Khan ; Ustad Imrat Khan 1
16. El Toro - Chico Hamilton Quintet Featuring Gabor Szabo 1
17. Tabla Solo (Tritala Rhythm) - Chatur Lal 1
18. Ecos Jerezanos (Echoes From Jerez) - Sabicas 1
19. Love Dance - Yusef Lateef 2
20. Before Dawn - Yusef Lateef 2
21. Jalsaghar (The Music Room) - Title Music - Ustad Vilayat Khan 2
22. Teen Kanya (Three Girls) - Satyajit Ray 2
23. Teen Kanya - Title Music 2
24. The Fateful Night (Monihara) 2
25. Mrinmoyee Sad (Samapti) 2
26. Improvisation On The Theme Of Pather Panchali - Ravi Shankar ; Bud Shank 2
27. Black Narcissus - Title Music - Brian Easdale 2
28. Black Narcissus - Kanchi's Dance - Brian Easdale 2
29. Moonlight On The Ganges - Martin Denny 3
30. Harem Silks From Bombay - Les Baxter's Orchestra 3
31. The Left Arm Of Buddha - Les Baxter's Orchestra 3
32. The Prince Of The Pagodas: Water Dances (Excerpt) - Benjamin Britten 3
33. Little Ugly Girl, Empress Of The Pagodas From Ma Mere L'oye - Maurice Ravel 3
34. Ondine From Gaspard De La Nuit - Maurice Ravel 3
35. Quatre Poèmes Hindous - Maurice Delage 3
36. Madras 3
37. Lahore 3
38. Benarès 3
39. Jaipur 4
40. Voiles From Préludes For Piano - Book One - Claude Debussy 4
41. Pagodes From Estampes For Piano - Claude Debussy 4
42. Romanian Folk Dances For Piano - Béla Bartók

More Info:

In the fifties, the influence of Indian music on the West manifested itself in the work of John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Dave Brubeck, Eric Dolphy and Ornette Coleman: pioneer jazz musicians of a golden generation who were fascinated by it's form and how it worked as a model of improvisation, the skill that lay at the heart of their own art. A decade later, It took the Beatles to catapult Indian music to the forefront of public awareness and make the sound of the sitar a common feature of popular culture in the West. Their engagement with the ancient classical music of the subcontinent started an avalanche of similar experiments in the rock and pop world, engendering what Ravi Shankar called 'the Sitar Explosion'. For a while, the sitar or some other element from Indian music was increasingly heard in the background of general texture of recordings by many famous British groups: the Rolling Stones, Traffic, Kinks, Yardbirds, to name but a few, while musicians working in the domestic folk-rock field such as Pentangle, the Incredible String Band, and the guitarist Davy Graham also picked up on it. In the United States, aspects of Indian music would be absorbed both by such psychedelic bands as The Byrds, The Doors, Grateful Dead and Jefferson Airplane and by composers of new music, the minimalists: Terry Riley, La Monte Young, Steve Reich and Philip Glass. But Western fascination with Orientalism was not entirely new; it's piquancy is evident in the works of such impressionists as Claude Debussy, Benjamin Britten and Maurice Ravel, a composer considered to be the father of Exotica, whose sound world is at the heart of the works of Exotica's most formidable icons, Les Baxter and Martin Denny. This presentation comprises key recordings by major Western jazz, exotica and classical artists under the spell of Indian music and culture, combined with the long, perfumed recordings by Ravi Shankar and his Indian contemporaries which most influenced them.