Lea Birringer - Mendelssoh & Sinding: Violin Concertos | RECORD STORE DAY
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Mendelssoh & Sinding: Violin Concertos
Artist: Lea Birringer
Format: CD

Details

Label: RUBICON
Rel. Date: 04/22/2022
UPC: 5065002228178

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DISC: 1

1. Sinding: Violin Concerto in a Minor, Op. 45: I. Allegro Energico
2. Sinding: Violin Concerto in a Minor, Op. 45: II. Andante
3. Sinding: Violin Concerto in a Minor, Op. 45: III. Allegro Giocoso
4. Sinding: Romance for Violin and Orchestra in D Major, Op. 100
5. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64: I. Allegro Molto Appassionato
6. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64: II. Andante
7. Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64: II. Andante - Allegretto Non Troppo

More Info:

Lea Birringer's first concerto recording is a fascinating program of the well-known and a delightful concerto that does not deserve the obscurity to which it has been consigned. Christian Sinding (1856-1941) composed his concerto 1898. It proved a great success, so it's neglect today is difficult to understand. It is certainly demanding on the soloist, but also flatters them. Full of memorable tunes and with brilliant use of the orchestra, this is a cleverly constructed work that deserves to be better known. The later Romance published in 1910 is a wonderfully tender, romantic piece similar to those by Bruch or Dvorak. Mendelssohn's evergreen concerto of 1845 occupies a place in the pantheon of great violin concertos. It was to be his last orchestral composition (a 3rd piano concerto remained unfinished), and represents perfection - playing without a break, it has many surprises, not least the entry of the soloist after a bar of accompaniment.