Lloyd Banks - Hunger For More | RECORD STORE DAY

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With the famous 50 Cent at his side G-unit member Lloyd Banks is sure to climb the charts. This is his debut album that features the two hot singles "Warrrior" and "On Fire."

Reviews:

''The Hunger for More'' is the debut album by G-Unit rapper Lloyd Banks, released June 29, 2004 on G-Unit Records and Interscope Records. Banks had been featured on 50 Cent's multi-platinum 2003 album ''Get Rich or Die Tryin, and on G-Unit's ''Beg for Mercy'' in November of the same year. And he had recently been named Mixtape Artist of the Year at the Mixtape Awards—for his appearances on G-Unit mixtapes as well as his own ''Money in the Bank'' series—when ''The Hunger for More'' was released by G-Unit Records and Interscope Records. - Wikipedia

Twenty-one-year-old G-Unit rapper Lloyd Banks has already made his imprint on mixtapes and piled up a wad of cash. His trajectory as a wee prodigy is such that he's been likened to NBA rookie LeBron James, a comparison he references on one of The Hunger for More's best tracks, "If You So Gangster." Above a spry bassline and piano bounce, Banks brags, "I'm rap's LeBron/ Teflon Don/ Baguettes on arm/ The next Sean John," in the smoky, dead-serious voice that garnered him hype in the first place.

Set to a palette of signature G-Unit hard-funk, The Hunger for More is a minefield of quips: on "I'm So Fly," Banks is not only "in the hood with more straps than a Jansport," but also "eatin' in Rome/ And you eatin' Roman noodles." Though Banks' story is slightly less cinematic than that of his mentor 50 Cent, his verse is more linear. (Though their attitudes towards women are equally vile.) And when it comes to capital, the LeBron comparison still applies: where the Cavaliers forward was pushing an $80,000 Hummer before he graduated from high school, Banks is "Only 21/ Sitting on mils" and "So fly/ I got money/ So that's a good enough reason to buy the things I buy." But, as Hunger winds down, the unabashed materialism and ho-hate gives way to grave narratives of the streets, watching friends die, and "hopin' your moms ain't the momma on crack rock." For all his tough mugging, such lyrics betray a slightly softer shell than those of his older crewmates.

"Twenty-one-year-old G-Unit rapper Lloyd Banks has already made his imprint on mixtapes and piled up a wad of cash. His trajectory as a wee prodigy is such that he's been likened to NBA rookie LeBron James, a comparison he references on one of The Hunger for More's best tracks, ""If You So Gangster."" Above a spry bassline and piano bounce, Banks brags, ""I'm rap's LeBron/ Teflon Don/ Baguettes on arm/ The next Sean John,"" in the smoky, dead-serious voice that garnered him hype in the first place.

Set to a palette of signature G-Unit hard-funk, The Hunger for More is a minefield of quips: on ""I'm So Fly,"" Banks is not only ""in the hood with more straps than a Jansport,"" but also ""eatin' in Rome/ And you eatin' Roman noodles."" Though Banks' story is slightly less cinematic than that of his mentor 50 Cent, his verse is more linear. (Though their attitudes towards women are equally vile.) And when it comes to capital, the LeBron comparison still applies: where the Cavaliers forward was pushing an $80,000 Hummer before he graduated from high school, Banks is ""Only 21/ Sitting on mils"" and ""So fly/ I got money/ So that's a good enough reason to buy the things I buy."" But, as Hunger winds down, the unabashed materialism and ho-hate gives way to grave narratives of the streets, watching friends die, and ""hopin' your moms ain't the momma on crack rock."" For all his tough mugging, such lyrics betray a slightly softer shell than those of his older crewmates.

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