Mondo Cozmo - It's Principle | RECORD STORE DAY
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DISC: 1

1. It's Principle!
2. Angels
3. Here I Am
4. Wild Horses
5. Killing Floor
6. Sundown in the Age of Fear
7. July 4
8. New Salvation
9. Leave a Light on 1
10. I'll Be Around

More Info:

Mondo Cozmo, the enigmatic musical force who commanded notoriety via critically acclaimed albums including, Plastic Soul and number one single "Shine," is set to release his latest studio album 'It's PRINCIPLE!', a varied, grizzled, intense, sincere and intricate rock album produced by Mark Rankin (Queens of the Stone Age, Adele, Florence + the Machine). Making fans from Butch Vig to Bruce Springsteen, who praised his songwriting in a New York Times article, it's an album destined to further elevate this singular singer-songwriter to unprecedented heights. Throughout the process, Cozmo was conscious that he needed to make a concise record that was focused, but he had an unprecedented creative spark. He wrote 70 songs. The title track, grimy rocking "It's PRINCIPLE!", is brazen in sound but sincere in their message, but it began as a song built around a lyric and idea, which in this case was "So I'm slashing tires on Main Street America." The album has a cocksure bluster of an artist that has run out of f*ks to give, and all the better for it. "Killing Floor" is a brawny epic, previously released single, "Angels," is a wall of sound rock epic with momental lyrics. "Sundown In An Age Of Fear," is more abstract but contains a refi ned energy, hard to pinpoint but compelling to it's core, while "Wild Horses," stomps us all into oblivion. In the end, Mondo Cozmo's fourth studio album is his most complete and vulnerable body of work, which marks a new beginning.