Low - A Lifetime of Temporary Relief: 10 Years of B-Sides & Rarities [Box] | RECORD STORE DAY

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A Lifetime of Temporary Relief: 10 Years of B-Sides & Rarities [Box]
A Lifetime of Temporary Relief: 10 Years of B-Sides & Rarities [Box]
Artist: Low
Format: CD

Details

Label: Chairkickers' Union Music
Catalog: 12
Rel. Date: 10/01/2005
UPC: 656605801223

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Details:

Boxed Set

More Info:

At long last, an exhaustive compilation of B-Sides, rarities, outtakes and demos from the past 10 years of Low's career. Featuring more than 53 songs assembled by the band, this box set contains 3 audio discs and 1 DVD. A Lifetime of Temporary Relief includes Low's first bedroom recordings (1993), all the way through to vinyl-only tracks from their recent CD, Trust (2002). Combined with a DVD that includes 11 Low videos, live footage and a series of documentaries, along with notes and images in a 32-page booklet compiled by the band, this box set truly encapsulates all that is Low. From quiet to loud, from Jandek to Journey, from subterranean to sublime, it's 10 years of Low all in one beautiful package.

Reviews:

Instead of a definitive best-of (which their eleven-year career deserves), this singularly slow Duluth chamber pop band has released a high-quality box set of unknown nuggets. These three audio CDs and one DVD contain everything that didn't make it on the five main Low albums and stopgap LPs, from 1994's pole-setting I Could Live in Hope to 2002's scintillating, Tchad Blake-mixed Trust. That's 52 tracks of credible b-sides, unreleased song demos, tribute-LP tracks, compilation tidbits, vinyl-only obscuros, viable outtakes, and early 1993 bedroom recordings-plus 11 videos, live footage, three documentaries and a 32-page booklet.

No one has yet found an apt comparison for this whisper-hushed, sometimes tantalizing, mesmerizing group. Even the band's choice of covers offers only the barest of clues-unless you think Jandek, Journey, Spacemen 3, Bob Dylan, John Denver, Soul Coughing, the Beatles (George Harrison), the Smiths (pretty "Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me"), '68 Bee Gees (yeah!), '63 Beach Boys, and a Nico tribute-somehow add up to one Low. Like the different yet sometimes as mum and beguiling Red House Painters, when Low touch a song they crystallize it their own peculiar amber.

But it's the plethora of unheard originals that prove most interesting, especially the 1993 demo "Lullaby." Not only does that word neatly sum up Low's first decade, but the entrancing repetition of its laggard central riff makes for supreme somniferous hypnotism, like the best reggae. Moreover, unlike the wildly fluctuating nature of your average GBV odds-and-ends upchuck box, say, Lifetime feels as invigorated as any of Low's "normal" releases.

"Instead of a definitive best-of (which their eleven-year career deserves), this singularly slow Duluth chamber pop band has released a high-quality box set of unknown nuggets. These three audio CDs and one DVD contain everything that didn't make it on the five main Low albums and stopgap LPs, from 1994's pole-setting I Could Live in Hope to 2002's scintillating, Tchad Blake-mixed Trust. That's 52 tracks of credible b-sides, unreleased song demos, tribute-LP tracks, compilation tidbits, vinyl-only obscuros, viable outtakes, and early 1993 bedroom recordings-plus 11 videos, live footage, three documentaries and a 32-page booklet.

No one has yet found an apt comparison for this whisper-hushed, sometimes tantalizing, mesmerizing group. Even the band's choice of covers offers only the barest of clues-unless you think Jandek, Journey, Spacemen 3, Bob Dylan, John Denver, Soul Coughing, the Beatles (George Harrison), the Smiths (pretty ""Last Night I Dreamt That Somebody Loved Me""), '68 Bee Gees (yeah!), '63 Beach Boys, and a Nico tribute-somehow add up to one Low. Like the different yet sometimes as mum and beguiling Red House Painters, when Low touch a song they crystallize it their own peculiar amber.

But it's the plethora of unheard originals that prove most interesting, especially the 1993 demo ""Lullaby."" Not only does that word neatly sum up Low's first decade, but the entrancing repetition of its laggard central riff makes for supreme somniferous hypnotism, like the best reggae. Moreover, unlike the wildly fluctuating nature of your average GBV odds-and-ends upchuck box, say, Lifetime feels as invigorated as any of Low's ""normal"" releases.

"