Kyung-Wha Chung / Radu Radu Lupu - Sonatas For Violin & Piano [180 Gram] | RECORD STORE DAY

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Audiophile 180g Virgin Vinyl LP! From The Original Analogue Masters of Universal Music! Pressed at Pallas! Violinist Kyung-Wha Chung and pianist Radu Lupu perform sonatas for violin and piano by Franck and Debussy. Recorded at Kingsway Hall, May 9-12, 1977. I enjoyed this record enormously. Why I liked this new issue so much is primarily because Kyung-Wha Chung and Radu Lupu do not sound like two internationally famous soloists flung together in a recording studio just for an afternoon. They not only play into each other's hands like a true, long-attuned duo, but also appreciate the very special intimacy of style (without any suggestion of muted ardour) inherent in chamber music. In Franck's Sonata the music itself seems to generate the ideal tempo for them and in this movement I also preferred their more restrained rubato in the first quasi lento episode so that it's resur-gence a few bars later (Tempo 1, Allegro) can emerge the more emphatic. The natural 'speaking' eloquence of the newcomers seems to me more truly Franckian. I also think the greater clarity of their recording is all to the music's good. Neither instru-ment sounds too close to the microphone. (Regarding the Debussy), I would suggest the new issue of this sonata as the easi-est to live with, catching all the music's moon-struck fantasy and wheedling melodic charm without self-conscious pursuit of either.